Animal Intelligence Dolphin

Animal Intelligence Dolphin s are highly social animals, often living in pods of up to a dozen individuals, though pod sizes and structures vary greatly between species and locations.
In places with a high abundance of food, pods can merge temporarily, forming a superpod; such groupings may exceed 1,000 dolphins.
Dolphins can, however, establish strong social bonds; they will stay with injured or ill individuals, even helping them to breathe by bringing them to the surface if needed.
This altruism does not appear to be limited to their own species.The dolphin Moko in New Zealand has been observed guiding a female Pygmy Sperm Whale together with her calf out of shallow water where they had stranded several times.

Animal Intelligence Dolphin

Animal Intelligence Dolphin

They have also been seen protecting swimmers from sharks by swimming circles around the swimmers or charging the sharks to make them go away.
Dolphins communicate using a variety of clicks, whistle-like sounds and other vocalizations. Dolphins also use nonverbal communication by means of touch and posturing.
Dolphins also display culture, something long believed to be unique to humans (and possibly other primate species).
In May 2005, a discovery in Australia found Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) teaching their young to use tools. They cover their snouts with sponges to protect them while foraging. This knowledge is mostly transferred by mothers to daughters, unlike simian primates, where knowledge is generally passed on to both sexes.

Forms of care-giving between fellows and even for members of different species (see Moko (dolphin)) are recorded in various species – such as trying to save weakened fellows or female pilot whales holding up dead calves for long periods.
Dolphins engage in acts of aggression towards each other. The older a male dolphin is, the more likely his body is to be covered with bite scars.
Male dolphins engage in acts of aggression apparently for the same reasons as humans: disputes between companions and competition for females.
Acts of aggression can become so intense that targeted dolphins sometimes go into exile after losing a fight.
Male bottlenose dolphins have been known to engage in infanticide. Dolphins have also been known to kill porpoises for reasons which are not fully understood, as porpoises generally do not share the same diet as dolphins and are therefore not competitors for food supplies.

Animal Intelligence Dolphin

Source : Wikipedia

Animal Intelligence Pigeons

Animal Intelligence Pigeons can remember large numbers of individual images for a long time, e.g. hundreds of images for periods of several years.

Trained domestic pigeons are able to return to the home loft if released at a location that they have never visited before and that may be up to 1000 KM away.

The ability a pigeon has to return home from a strange location necessitates two sorts of information. The first, called “map sense” is their geographic location. The second, “compass sense” is the bearing they need to fly from their new location in order to reach their home.

The most popular conception of how pigeons are able to do this is that they are able to sense the Earth’s magnetic field with tiny magnetic tissues in their head (magnetoception).

Animal Intelligence Pigeons

Animal Intelligence Pigeons

Another theory is that pigeons have compass sense, which uses the position of the sun, along with an internal clock, to work out direction. However, studies have shown that if magnetic disruption or clock changes disrupt these senses, the pigeon can still manage to get home.

The variability in the effects of manipulations to these sense of the pigeons indicates that there is more than one cue on which navigation is based and that map sense appears to rely on a comparison of available cues.

Other potential cues used include:

The use of a sun compass.
Nocturnal navigate by stars.
Visual landmark map.
Navigation by infrasound map.
Polarised light compass.
Olfactory stimuli.

Animal Intelligence Pigeons

Source : Wikipedia

 

Animal Intelligence Elephant

Animal Intelligence Elephant have highly evolved social capabilities and often show wise, compassionate and loving behaviors. Elephants having amazing memories and can remember friends and enemies for a half century or more, depending on their health and lifetime.  Elephants are capable of hearing at low frequencies and are most sensitive at … Continue reading →